Austrian Economics

Series Editor: Per L. Bylund

 
Per L. Bylund

Per L. Bylund is Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship and Records-Johnston Professor of Free Enterprise in the School of Entrepreneurship at Oklahoma State University, USA. He is an associate fellow of the Ratio Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, a research fellow at the McQuinn Center of Entrepreneurial Leadership at the University of Missouri, an Associated Scholar with the Mises Institute and a senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises-institutet i Sverige. He was the recipient of the 2015 Lawrence W. Fertig Prize in Austrian Economics. His books include The Problem of Production: A New Theory of the Firm (2016) and The Seen, the Unseen, and the Unrealized: How Regulations Affect Our Everyday Lives (2016).

 

Editorial Board

Peter Boettke, George Mason University, USA
Todd Chiles, University of Missouri, USA
Richard Ebeling, The Citadel, USA
Glenn Fox, University of Guelph, Canada
Josh Hall, West Virginia University, USA
Randall Holcombe, Florida State University
Guido Hulsmann, University of Angers, France
Peter Klein, Baylor University, USA
Peter Kurrild-Klitgaard, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Richard Langlois, University of Connecticut, USA
Roderick Long, Auburn University, USA
Ben Powell, Texas Tech University, USA
Joseph T. Salerno, Auburn University, USA
Pascal Salin, Paris-Dauphine University, France
Josef Sima, CEVRO Institut, Czech Republic
Jesus Huerto De Soto, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain
Ulrich Witt, University of Jena, Germany

Series Description

This book series publishes new scholarship within the Austrian school of economics. Although considered outside of mainstream economics since the 1930s, the Austrian school has continued to thrive as an alternative position that traces back to the marginalist revolution.

The Austrian approach provides unique insight into market processes and offers a powerful framework for understanding major economic events such as the fall of socialist economies in the early 1990s and the financial crisis of 2007–08. Thanks to this promise, and to the limitations of mainstream economics, the Austrian tradition of social thought has recently attracted increasing interest from a new generation of economists, social scientists, and related scholars.

The series seeks to capture this renewed interest by publishing original research within the modern Austrian tradition: contributions that make new theoretical advances – building on the work of Mises, Hayek, Rothbard, Kirzner, Lachmann and others – or that offer fresh and novel applications of this work. The series publishes research that advances or relates to the Austrian tradition from scholars in economics, management, philosophy, political science, sociology, and related fields.

The series invites contributions from both new and established scholars and welcomes proposals ranging from multi-authored collections of essays to single-authored monographs. Junior scholars are especially encouraged to submit their work.

For further details, or to discuss submitting a proposal, please contact the series editor per.bylund@okstate.edu or publisher steven.gerrard@agendapub.com.

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